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College of Science
Calendar of Events 2017 This Week
Tuesday, March 21
Neuroscience Seminar Series, 4:00 p.m., Boca, EE, 106
VC to Jupiter MC-17, Davie LA 148, HBOI LE 108D
Speaker: Larry J. Young, Ph.D.
Director, Emory Conte Center for Oxytocin and Social Cognition, William P. Timmie Professor of Psychiatry
Host: Randy D. Blakely, Ph.D.
Title: Neural Mechanisms of Social bonding and Empathy: Implications for Autism
Questions? Contact Hannah Anderson,  [email protected]
 
Friday, March 24
Marine Science Seminar, 12:00 p.m., SC 141 (Boca), LA 148 (Davie), and MC 209 (HBOI)
Speaker: Dr. Jeremy Vaudo
Title:  Mako Madness: Movements of shortfin mako sharks in the western North Atlantic
Abstract: Mako sharks are a prized catch in both recreational and commercial fisheries.  Despite their popularity and potential importance as an upper level predator, little information is available on mako shark movements.  Over the last several years, the Guy Harvey Research Institute has been using satellite tracking methods to investigate the movements of these predators throughout the western North Atlantic.  Find out more at: www.ghritracking.org
Questions? Contact Marianne Porter, [email protected]
 
Friday, March 24
Canvas Workshops for Instructors, Noon to 2:00 p.m.
Get help moving your course(s) from BB to Canvas, get your canvas questions answered, and have OIT Canvas experts available for assistance!
Register @ techevents.fau.edu
 
Friday, March 24
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Seminar, 2:00 p.m., Boca, PS 226
Speaker: Bobby Deutsch, Graduate Student
Title: High-Performance Overall Water Splitting Electrocatalysts Derived from Cobalt-Based Metal−Organic Frameworks
Questions? [email protected]
 
Friday, March 24
Frontiers in Science: 2017 Public Lecture Series, Lecture: 3:30 p.m., Reception: 4:30 p.m., Boca Raton, BU 120
Speaker: Dr. Timothy Williams
Medical Director, Radiation Oncology at Lynn Cancer Institute, Boca Raton Regional Hospital
Title: New Frontiers in Radiation Oncology
“We have seven speakers for you this year, experts in the fields of Biology, Chemistry, Geosciences, Marine Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, and Psychology. We’ve brought them to you from across the globe and right here in our own community. My hope is that these lectures stir you to deeper learning, explain your world, ignite your discussions, and bring the richness of the sciences to you.” – Ata Sarajedini, Ph.D., New Dean, Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Questions? Contact Mary Beth Mudrick at (561)297-4526 or [email protected] Previous Events
Tuesday, March 14
Department of Mathematical Sciences: Pi Day @ FAU, various locations from 10:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
10:30 a.m. – Dean’s welcome, Department Chair’s welcome @ SO patio
10:45 a.m. – Kids event with Karen Slattery, ERCCD-VPK @ SO patio
11:00 a.m. – Pi in the face with FAU football players @ SO patio
1:00 p.m. – Pi talk by Dr. Tomas Schonbek @ SE 319B
1:59 p.m. – Pi recitation: the most digits from memory @ SE 319B
Prizes for the Pi contest include books, movie tickets, and lunch with the Department Chair!
Questions?  [email protected][email protected], or [email protected]  

Thursday, March 16
Analysis and Applications Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Boca, SE 215
Speaker: Koushik Ramachandran, Oklahoma State University
Title: Equidistribution of Zeros of Random Polynomials
Will address a setting where the distribution of random coefficients need not be Gaussian.
Questions?  [email protected]


Friday, March 17
Geosciences Colloquium Series, 2:00 p.m. to 3:20 p.m., Boca, SE 417
VC to Davie DW 327, Harbor Branch LE 108D
Speaker: April Watson, FAU
Title: "More than just a beer" activating the urban landscape, economics, social networks and creation of place
Questions? Contact Caiyun Zhang, [email protected]

Friday, March 10
The Institute for Sensing and Embedded Network Systems Engineering, 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., HBOI LE 247
VC to Boca EE 303 & OE 187, Sea Tech ST 250
Speaker: Jordan Beckler, Ph.D., Program Manager for the Ocean Technology Research Program, Mote Marine Lab, Sarasota, FL.
Title: Remote Monitoring of the Biogeochemistry of the West Florida Shelf
Abstract: This talk will give an overview of the activities of the Ocean Technology Program at Mote Marine Lab, with special emphasis on our efforts to adapt analytical chemistry techniques for in situ use to improve the cost and the spatial and temporal resolution of oceanographic observations and applying these techniques to better understand elemental cycling such as those for carbon and macro- and micronutrients. It will highlight several main projects:
1) Optical Phytoplankton Discriminators (OPD) are in situ visible spectrophotometers with a unique ability to filter water samples repeatedly prior to introduction into a longpathlength absorption cell. While OPDs have been employed on Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) gliders for over a decade, recent efforts have focused on enhancing the ability of the instruments to decompose Inherent Optical Properties (IOP) from the combined absorption signal as well as their ability to perform in situ colorimetric analyses; 2) The Ocean Technology Program team has recently begun developing appropriate analytical chemistry techniques to be employed by an in situ High Performance Liquid Chromatograph (HPLC) to fingerprint and quantify red tide toxins in situ; and 3) Elucidating the physical and biogeochemical controls on soluble organic-iron(III) and nutrient fluxes from estuarine sediments using in situ voltammetric techniques and their potential role in contributing to harmful algae blooms.
Questions?  [email protected] or (561)297-4889

Friday, March 10
Frontiers in Science: 2017 Public Lecture Series, Lecture: 3:30 p.m., Reception: 4:30 p.m., Boca Raton, BU 120
Speaker: Robert W. Ghrist, Ph.D.
Andrea Mitchell Penn Integrating Knowledge Professor
Department of Mathematics and Electrical/Systems Engineering
University of Pennsylvania
Title: Sensors & Systems to Signals & Neuroscience: Topological Data Analysis
“We have seven speakers for you this year, experts in the fields of Biology, Chemistry, Geosciences, Marine Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, and Psychology. We’ve brought them to you from across the globe and right here in our own community. My hope is that these lectures stir you to deeper learning, explain your world, ignite your discussions, and bring the richness of the sciences to you.” – Ata Sarajedini, Ph.D., New Dean, Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Questions? Contact Mary Beth Mudrick at (561)297-4526 or [email protected]

Monday, February 27
FAUST Seminar, 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., Boca, Rm 319
Speaker: Dr. Katherine Freese, George Eugene Uhlenbeck Collegiate Professor of Physics
Dr. Freese, theoretical astrophysicist, is the George Eugene Uhlenbeck Collegiate Professor of Physics at the University of Michigan. Starting in September 2014, she assumed the position of Director of Nordita, the Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics, in Stockholm, and holds a position as Visiting Professor of Physics at Stockholm University. She is known for her work in theoretical cosmology at the interface of particle physics and astrophysics.
Title: Overview of Dark Matter
Questions?  [email protected]

Tuesday, February 28
FAU Staff Forum: Meet and Greet, 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m., Boca, Student Union, Palmetto Palm Room, Second Floor, Room 230
VC to Davie LA 139, Jupiter AD 204, Ft. Lauderdale HEC 608, HBOI LE 103
Please join the FAU Staff Forum for a meet and greet with Danita Nias, new vice president for institutional advancement and CEO of the FAU Foundation!
Ms. Nias has served in fundraising posts at the University of Florida and the University of Maryland.  She is considered one of the country’s most successful fundraisers. Ms. Nias is a graduate of the University of Maryland, where she concentrated on personnel and labor relations and holds a master’s degree in international relations from Syracuse University.
Questions and RSVP:  [email protected]

Wednesday, March 1
Center for Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Spring 2017 Seminar, 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m., Boca, EE 106
VC to Jupiter RF 119, Davie LA 148, HBOI LE 108D
Speaker: Larry F. Lemanski, Ph.D., Distinguished Research Professor
Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Texas A&M University-Commerce, Texas
Hosted by: Dr. Xupei Huang
Title: RNAs that Can Direct the Differentiation of Stem Cells into Cardiomyocytes
Abstract: We have discovered a unique RNA initially in the Mexican axolotl, a salamander, and then in humans that can turn nonmuscle cells into cardiomyocytes with normal myofibrils. We named it CIR for Cardiac Inducing RNA. Our earlier studies used a cardiac-mutant axolotl (salamander) embryonic heart bioassay. Noncontracting mutant embryonic hearts, lacking organized myofibrils, were placed in organ cultures with CIR derived from normal axolotl or human hearts. After 48-72 hours, the mutant axolotl hearts beat rhythmically, and immunofluorescent staining with contractile protein antibodies (e.g., antitropomyosin, anti-cardiac specific troponin T) revealed the appearance of organized sarcomeric myofibrils of normal morphology. These studies were expanded to mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC), mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells derived from fibroblasts, and human iPS cells derived from skin. Immunofluorescent staining of the iPS cells and ESCs cultured with CIR at a final concentration of 1ng/µl and stained with cardiac-specific troponin T (cTnT) clearly showed their differentiation into cardiomyocytes. We also showed that mutant axolotl hearts, mouse embryonic stem cells and mouse and human iPS cells as well as primary cultures of fibroblasts respond to the CIRs by differentiating into cardiomyocytes with cardiac-specific proteins, characteristic spindle-shaped cardiomyocyte shapes in culture, and cardiac sarcomeric myofibrils of normal morphology. We cloned and sequenced the active RNA components in axolotl and human CIR. Axolotl CIR is unique in the gene-bank databases, while the two active human CIRs we discovered show significant sequence homology with (1) the human COX2 superfamily of genes and (2) human exon 8 of N-sulfoglucosamine sulfhydrolase (SGSH).  Both human CIRs proved to be functional homologues of axolotl CIR in that they promote the expression of cardiac proteins and myofibril formation in mutant axolotl hearts as well as in mammalian stem cells.  We are just beginning studies to create acute myocardial infarction (AMI) models to test whether infarcted myocardium treated with the CIR or with CIR-treated stem cells or fibroblasts can regenerate/repair the damaged tissue and turn it into functional cardiac muscle again.
Questions?  [email protected]


Friday, March 3
Marine Science Seminar, 12:00 p.m., SC 141 (Boca), LA 148 (Davie), and MC 209 (HBOI)
Speaker: Dr. Stephen Kajiura
Title: Where have all the blacktips gone?
Abstract: Dr. Kajiura will be giving us an update on the annual blacktip shark migration in Palm Beach.  The 2017 migration has been underwhelming compared to previous years and the water temperature has been notably warmer.  Also, as many students are preparing for summer conferences, Dr. Kajiura will be doing a short primer on good presentation graphics for posters and talks.    
Questions? Contact Marianne Porter, [email protected]

Friday, March 3
Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SJAM) Colloquium, Noon, Boca, SE 319B
Speaker: Dr. Justin Tittelfitz, Amazon Web Services
Justin Tittelfitz currently works as a research scientist at Amazon Web Services. He received his PhD in Mathematics from the University of Washington in 2013. Before joining Amazon, Dr. Tittelfitz worked as a postdoctoral researcher at Purdue University, studying acoustic inverse source problems.
Title: Applications of Machine Learning to Fraud Detection
Abstract: In this talk, we look at how techniques from machine learning and data mining can be put to use to solve many problems, from Market Basket Analysis to Fraud Detection. We will go over some basic concepts in the field, and then look at an application of the Apriori Algorithm to finding actionable patterns in large datasets.
Questions?  [email protected] 


Thursday, February 23
Analysis and Applications Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Boca, SE 215
Speaker: Ray Sheombarsing (VU Amsterdam)
Title: Validated computations for connecting orbits of ODEs
Abstract: In this talk we present a computer-assisted procedure for proving the existence of transverse heteroclinic orbits connecting hyperbolic equilibria of polynomial vector fields. The idea is to compute high-order Taylor approximations of local charts on the (un)stable manifolds by using the Parameterization Method and to use Chebyshev series to parameterize the orbit in between. The existence of a heteroclinic orbit can then be established by setting up an appropriate fixed-point problem amenable to computer-assisted analysis. In addition, we explain how this method can be used to perform validated continuation. This is joint work with Jan Bouwe van den Berg and Christian Reinhardt.
Hosted by: Dr. Mireles
Questions?  [email protected]

Wednesday, February 22
STEM Career Fair, Noon to 4:00 p.m., Boca
We have several companies coming to recruit students and alumni, join us!

Thursday, February 23
Big Data Lecture, 3:30 p.m., Boca, BC 128
Speaker: Paul Ormerod
Title: Emotions, uncertainty and Big Data: what these mean for policy makers, business and economics
CV: Paul Ormerod is an economist and best-selling author. His first book, the Death of Economics, sold 1.5 million copies worldwide. His Why Most Things Fail was a Business Week’s US Business Book of the Year. He writes a weekly column for the City AM newspaper in London. 

He is a Visiting Professor at University College London (UCL), now the top ranked research university in the UK. In 2006 he was elected a Fellow of the British Academy of Social Science, and has been awarded a DSc honoris causa by the University of Durham, UK, for “the distinction of your contribution to economics”. Paul studied economics at Cambridge, and then took the MPhil in economics at Oxford.

His career has spanned the academic and commercial sectors, and he is currently involved in two start-up tech companies in the UK analysing Big Data. More details at www.paulormerod.com

Abstract: Emotions and uncertainty play a much greater role in policy than is recognised by the rational agent model of economics, which is still the basis for a great deal of policy making, especially in public policy. I illustrate this point with a number of important empirical examples, and discuss why economists continue to retain such a powerful influence over policy. Finally, I describe how very recent developments in AI algorithms enable concepts such as emotion and uncertainty to be measured in policy contexts for the first time.
Questions?  [email protected]

Friday, February 24
Pre-Health Professions Office: 2017 Workshop Series, 2:00 p.m., Boca, SE 319B
Speaker: Shari Goldstein
Title: The Application Process
Recommended for: students on the verge of applying and taking their MCAT within the next 4 months. Overview of the entire application process from MCAT to interviews and everything in between.
Questions? Contact [email protected] 

Friday, February 24
Geosciences Colloquium Series, 2:00 p.m. to 3:20 p.m., Boca, SE 417 and VC to Davie DW 327, and to Harbor Branch LE 108D
Speaker: Yan Yao, South Florida Water Management District
Title: “Geographically Weighted Spatial Modelling of Sediment Quality in Lake Okeechobee, Florida”
Questions?  Contact Caiyun Zhang, [email protected]

Friday, February 24
Frontiers in Science: 2017 Public Lecture Series, Lecture: 3:30 p.m., Reception: 4:30 p.m., Boca Raton, EE 106
Speaker: Anton F. Post, Ph.D.
Executive Director, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, Florida Atlantic University
Title: Staying Afloat: The Molecular Ecology of Antarctic Phytoplankton
“We have seven speakers for you this year, experts in the fields of Biology, Chemistry, Geosciences, Marine Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, and Psychology. We’ve brought them to you from across the globe and right here in our own community. My hope is that these lectures stir you to deeper learning, explain your world, ignite your discussions, and bring the richness of the sciences to you.” – Ata Sarajedini, Ph.D., New Dean, Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Questions? Contact Mary Beth Mudrick at (561)297-4526 or [email protected]

Friday, February 24-25
FURC 2017, for times and places of specific events, please click  here .
The Florida Undergraduate Research Conference (FURC) is one of the nation's largest multi-disciplinary research conferences. It is an annual event open to all undergraduate researchers in the state of Florida to present their research in a poster forum. Every year the conference will be hosted at a different university in the state on the last weekend in February. In addition to research presentations, there are also exhibitors from graduate programs and other opportunities targeted for students involved in undergraduate research.
Questions? Please contact [email protected]

Tuesday, February 14
Crypto Seminar, 3:00 p.m., Boca, SE 215
Speaker: Aaron Hutchinson
Title: d-MUL: A New Multidimensional Scalar Multiplication Algorithm
Abstract: We propose new algorithms for constructing multidimensional differential addition chains and for performing multidimensional scalar point multiplication based on these chains. Our algorithms work in any dimension and offer some key efficiency and security features. In particular, our scalar point multiplication algorithm is uniform, has high potential for constant time implementation, and can be parallelized. We present the algorithm and some of its key features.
Questions? Contact [email protected]

Wednesday, February 15
Center for Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Seminar, 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m., Boca EE 106
VC to Jupiter, RF 119, Davie LA 148, HBOI LE 108D
Speaker: Dr. Minoru Koi, PhD, Associate Research Scientist, Division of Gastroenterology,
Department of Internal Medicine, University Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.
Title: “Biology of Colorectal Cancer”
Abstract:  Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the world, with about 1.4 million cases diagnosed in 2012.  Prognosis of CRC patients is largely depending on the stage of tumor at diagnosis.  In the US, 5-year survival rate following surgical removal of tumor for localized cases (stage I), regional (stage II and III) and distant (stage IV) is 90.3%, 70.4% and 12.5% respectively.  Current options of standard treatment for CRC includes 1) a surgical removal alone for stage I, and most of stage II CRC, and 2) a surgical removal followed by adjuvant 5-FU-based chemotherapy for high-risk stage II and Stage III CRC.  For metastatic stage IV disease, surgical removal of primary CRC and/or metastasis lesions is followed by drug-therapy using variety of chemotherapy and targeted treatment.  Thus, mortality rate exhibited by each stage, ~10% (stage I), ~30% (stage II/III) and ~88% (IV) represents limitations of current treatments and those of initial diagnosis, indicating that more precise diagnosis measures and effective treatments are required.  Recently, two remarkable progresses that may impact on future diagnosis and treatment for CRC have been made in tumor immunology field.  First, during the last decade, a relationship between immunological landscape in primary CRC determined by high-throughput quantitative measurement of cellular and molecular characteristics, and patient’s prognosis has been examined. The results of these studies indicate that 1) inflammatory/immunological response in CRC is heterogynous among patients; 2) an enhanced T lymphocytic reaction, especially generation of mature memory T cells, in tumor tissues reflects an improved prognosis: but 3) cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) in tumor tissues antagonizes T cell anti-tumor activity and negatively controls patients’ prognosis, thus balance between these two factors may determine, to a large extent, disease outcome; 4) a classification of CRCs according to their immunological status of tumor microenvironment may accurately predict patients outcome, and identify high-risk patients with stage I/II/III CRCs that may recur after surgery.  Second, immunotherapies against stage IV cancers using immune checkpoint inhibitors including anti-cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) antibody, anti-programed death 1 (PD-1) antibody, and anti-programmed cell death-1 ligand-1 (PD-L1) antibody have been revolutionizing cancer treatment.  In CRC, it has been shown that microsatellite instable (MSI) subset but not microsatellite stable (MSS) subset of cancer is susceptible for checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapy.  Thus, the effects of these immune checkpoint inhibitors reassured that the adaptive immune response, even in stage IV disease, plays a critical role for tumor elimination although their efficacies seem to be depending on genetic/epigenetic and immunological background of each tumor.  In this lecture, I will talk about epidemiological statistics about CRC, cancer staging, genetics and immunology of CRC in relationship to 2 new progress in CRC research field mentioned above.
Hosted by: Dr. Yoshimi Shibata, Ph.D.
Questions? Marjorie Cazeau ([email protected]) or more information or to subscribe to the seminar email list.


Saturday, February 18
Science Olympiad: Middle and High School, Boca Raton Campus
The Charles E. Schmidt College of Science announces the 9th Annual FAU Southeast Regional Science Olympiad, a science competition for middle and high school students devoted to improving the quality of science education, increasing student interest in science, and providing recognition for outstanding achievement in science education by both students and teachers. More than 1,000 students, families, teachers and volunteers will visit FAU's Boca Raton campus to compete at knowledge and technology-based hands-on events. For more information, click here.
To volunteer the day of the event, register here.
Questions? For more information, contact Ingrid Johansen at [email protected].            

Monday, February 6
FURC 2017: Late registration deadline (Late registration begins January 24, 2017)
For more information on how to register, please click  here .
The Florida Undergraduate Research Conference (FURC) is one of the nation's largest multi-disciplinary research conferences. It is an annual event open to all undergraduate researchers in the state of Florida to present their research in a poster forum. Every year the conference will be hosted at a different university in the state on the last weekend in February. In addition to research presentations, there are also exhibitors from graduate programs and other opportunities targeted for students involved in undergraduate research.
Questions? Please contact [email protected] 

Monday, February 6
Coastal Lecture Series, 6:30 p.m., Blake Library in Stuart: 2351 SE Monterey Rd, Stuart, FL 34996
Title: Florida's Sea Turtles Nests over the Past Decade: Hot Beaches, Hot Babes, Rotten Eggs
Speaker: Jeanette Wyneken
Abstract: Over the past decade, sea turtle nests on Florida's east coast have been increasing in temperature as the beaches warm.  In many cases, the temperatures are so warm that eggs die. Nests that survive tend to produce fewer hatchlings that those that incubate at cooler temperatures. May hatchlings look normal during their few minutes between emerging from the nest and crawling to the ocean.  Yet, studies at the FAU marine lab are identifying problems that show up days to weeks later, but also resilience by some nests to the extreme weather.  The causes of concern and the causes for hope for these iconic animals will be the subject.
For more information, visit this  link
Questions? Contact[email protected]  

Tuesday, February 7
Neuroscience Seminar Series, 4:00 p.m., Boca, EE 106
VC to Jupiter MC 119, Davie LA 148, HBOI LE108D
Title: GPCR Functional Selectivity in the Actions of Dopamine: Implication for Improved Therapies
Speaker: Marc G. Caron, Ph.D.
James B. Duke Professor, Department of Cell Biology, Medicine and Neurobiology, Duke University Medical Center
Host: Janet Robishaw, Ph.D.
Questions?  [email protected]  

Tuesday, February 7
OURI & CSI Panel: Meeting of the Minds, 5:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Boca, Grand Palm Room
About: Join us for this semester’s Meeting of the Minds. Learn about undergraduate research in your field of study. This time we will have clubs and professors from the colleges of Arts & Letters, Business, Design & Social Inquiry, and Education all seeking motivated undergraduates for research positions. As always, all majors are welcome. There will be food, prizes and oh-so-much networking. Business casual is encouraged.
Questions? Contact Tevin Ali [email protected] 

Wednesday, February 8
The Center for Complex Systems and Brain Sciences and The Department of Psychology, 4:00 p.m., Boca, BS 303
Title: Cognitive Development as a Dynamic System
Speaker: Linda B. Smith, Indiana University
Chancellor’s Professor and Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Brain Sciences
Questions? Contact [email protected] 

Wednesday, February 8
Center for Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Seminar, 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m., Boca EE 106
VC to Jupiter RF 119, Davie LA 148, HBOI LE108D
Speaker: Dr. Catherine Von Reyn, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems,Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA.
Title: “Understanding sensorimotor circuit function and design through genetic engineering”
Abstract: Animals adapt their behavior according to specific sensory features present within their environment.  How an animal’s nervous system extracts and integrates sensory information to guide an appropriate behavioral response remains a major question in the field of neuroscience.  Within recent years, a surge in the development of genetic technologies for probing and characterizing the nervous system has brought a new level of neural accessibility to answer this question.  Here, I describe how we apply emerging neural engineering tools and take advantage of the relatively small CNS (approximately 200,000 neurons) of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to map neural circuits driving sensorimotor transformations.  We focus on highly conserved transformations: avoidance responses to objects approaching on a direct collision course.  As a failure to recognize an approaching threat can be deleterious, animals from fruit flies to humans are capable of detecting approaching objects and employing rapid maneuvers to avoid collision or predation.  Using whole cell electrophysiology and detailed behavioral quantifications, we uncover the sensorimotor circuits involved in avoidance responses and the algorithms responsible for transforming the visual information from an object’s approach into an optimal motor strategy.
Hosted by: Dr. Tanja Godenschwege, Ph.D.
Questions? Marjorie Cazeau ([email protected]) for more information or to subscribe to the seminar email list.

Thursday, February 9
Analysis and Applications Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Boca, SE 215
Speaker: Dr. Patrick Hagan
Title: The Solution of Uhlenbeck’s Unsolved Problem B
Abstract: Boltzmann (transport) equations arise in semiconductors, plasmas, nuclear reactors, and any other situations in which one needs to keep track of the velocity (momentum) distribution of particles at each point in space, instead of just the spatial density. In these problems, one can prescribe boundary conditions only for velocities pointing into the region; obtaining the  distribution of particles for outgoing velocities is part of the solution. Analyzing these problems requires constructing half-range expansions: unlike standard eigenfunction expansions, in which one seeks to reconstruct a given function over its entire domain using all the eigenfunctions, in half-range expansions one needs to reconstruct a given function over just half the domain, but one can only use half the eigenfunctions. We use complex variable theory, namely, a variant of the Weiner-Hopf technique, to create a method for constructing such half-range expansions explicitly. This method is then used to solve Uhlenbeck’s Unsolved Problem B, where it is found that the dimensionless Milne length is given by the Riemann zeta function at 1/2, namely 1.46035…
Questions? Erik Lundberg [email protected]

Friday, February 10
Geosciences Colloquium Series, 2:00 p.m. to 3:20 p.m., Boca, SE 417 and VC to Davie DW 327, and to Harbor Branch LE 108D
Speaker: Kate Detwiler, Anthropology, FAU
Title: “Adaptive radiation and conservation of forest monkeys in Central and East Africa”
Questions? Contact Caiyun Zhang, [email protected] 

Friday, February 10
Frontiers in Science: 2017 Public Lecture Series, Lecture: 3:30 p.m., Reception: 4:30 p.m., Boca Raton, BU 120
Speaker: Michal Kosinski, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor in Organizational Behavior at Stanford University Graduate School of Business
Research Fellow, Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University
Lecturer, University of California at Berkeley and San Francisco State University
Title: Predicting Psychological Traits from Big Data
“We have seven speakers for you this year, experts in the fields of Biology, Chemistry, Geosciences, Marine Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, and Psychology. We’ve brought them to you from across the globe and right here in our own community. My hope is that these lectures stir you to deeper learning, explain your world, ignite your discussions, and bring the richness of the sciences to you.” – Ata Sarajedini, Ph.D., New Dean, Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Questions? Contact Mary Beth Mudrick at (561)297-4526 or [email protected]

Friday, February 10
Mathematical Sciences Colloquium, 4:00 p.m., Boca, SE 215
Speaker: Michal Tomasz Godziszewski, Ph.D., University of Warsaw, Poland
Title: Axiomatic Theories of Truth – Conservativeness and Deflationism
Abstract: An axiomatic theory of truth is a formal deductive theory where the property of a sentence being true is treated as a primitive undefined predicate. Logical properties of many axiom systems for the truth predicate have been discussed in the context of the so-called truth-theoretic deflationism, i.e. a view according to which truth is a 'thin' or 'innocent' property without any explanatory or justificary power with respect to non-semantic facts. 

I will discuss the state of the art concerning proof-theoretic and model-theoretic properties of the most commonly studied axiomatic theories of truth (typed and untyped, both disquotational and compositional ones), focusing in particular on the problem of syntactic and semantic conservativeness of truth theories over a base (arithmetical) theory (treated mostly as a theory of syntax). I will relate the results to the research on satisfaction classes in models of arithmetic, and if the time allows, to analysis of some semantic paradoxes.
Coffee and cookies before the talk!
Questions? Contact Markus Schmidmeier [email protected]

Tuesday, January 31
FAU Staff Forum: meet and greet, 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m., Boca, Student Union: Palmetto Palm Room, Rm 230
VC to Davie DW 108, HBOI LE 247B, Jupiter HC 130, Ft Lauderdale HEC 608
Speaker: Ryan Britton
Executive director of government relations
Find out what FAU's presence is all about in Tallahassee; he will review metrics and rankings of universities across the state; as well as policy issues and funding impacts.
Questions?  [email protected] (Please RSVP)

Tuesday, January 31
Neuroscience Seminar Series, 4:00 p.m., Jupiter, Research Facility MC 119
VC to Boca EE 106, Davie LA 148, HBOI LE 108D
Speaker: Edwin Levitan, Ph.D.
Professor and Vice Chair of Research, Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, University of Pittsburgh
Host: Tanja Godenschwege, Ph.D.
Title: Organelle Delivery and Redox Communication in Monoaminergic Neurons
Questions?  [email protected] 

Thursday, February 2
Analysis and Applications Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Boca SE 215
Speaker: William Hahn
Title: Compressed Sensing and Machine Learning
Abstract: In this talk we will see how sparse vectors can be randomly under-sampled and then perfectly recovered w.h.p. Connections to high-dimensional geometry and applications in cryptography and machine learning will be discussed.
Questions? Contact Erik Lundberg [email protected]

Friday, February 3
Marine Science Seminar, 12:00 p.m., Boca  SC 141, Davie LA 148, and HBOI MC 209
Speaker: Dr Christine Bedore
Title: Sensory Ecology of Marine Animals
Abstract: Dr. Bedore, a graduate of the FAU IB program, will be speaking about her work on the sensory ecology of sharks, skates, rays, and other marine animals.  After graduate from FAU, she was a post doctoral researcher at Duke University and is now an assistant professor at Georgia Southern University.     
Questions? Contact Marianne Porter, [email protected]

Friday, February 3
Geosciences Colloquium Series, 2:00 p.m. to 3:20 p.m., Boca, SE 417 and VC to Davie DW 327, and to Harbor Branch LE 108D
Speaker: Kelly Martin, Environmental Analyst for Palm Beach County
Title: “Sea turtles and beach restoration – finding the balance between conservation, tourism, and coastal stability”
Questions? Contact Caiyun Zhang, [email protected]

Friday, February 3
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Seminar, 3:00 p.m., Boca, PS 226 and VC to Jupiter JDM-SR 275
Speaker: Maria Carolina Rodriguez, Ph.D., Research Assistant Professor
Title: “Targeting cancer-specific glycans by cyclic peptide lectinomimics”
Abstract: The transformation from normal to malignant phenotype in human cancers is associated with cell-surface antigen alteration, including over-expression of certain glycans. Thus, targeting glycosylation changes in cancer is likely to provide not only better insight into the roles of carbohydrates in biological systems, but also facilitate the development of new molecular probes for bioanalytical and biomedical applications. In the reported study, we have synthesized lectinomimics based on odorranalectin 1; the smallest lectin-like cyclic peptide isolated from the skin of the Odorrana grahami frog, and assessed the ability of these peptides to bind specific sugars on molecular and cellular levels. We have shown that the more labile disulfide bond found in 1 can be replaced with a lactam bridge. Further, a strong correlation between conformation and lectin-like properties was observed.  Naturally occurring cyclic peptide 1 and its amide analog 3, displaying similar conformational properties, bind preferentially L-fucose, and to a lesser degree D-galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, typically found within the mucin O-glycan core structures. In cell-based assays, cyclic peptides 1 and 3 showed a similar binding profile to Aleuria aurantia lectin. These two peptides inhibited significantly the migration ability of metastatic breast cancer cell lines in a Transwell assay. Altogether, our data demonstrate the feasibility of designing lectinomimics based on small cyclic peptides that can be further tailored toward tumor-specific glycan structures using a variety of synthetic approaches.
Questions? Contact [email protected]

Monday, January 23
FURC 2017: Registration deadline (Registration begins October 1, 2016)
For more information on how to register, please click  here .
The Florida Undergraduate Research Conference (FURC) is one of the nation's largest multi-disciplinary research conferences. It is an annual event open to all undergraduate researchers in the state of Florida to present their research in a poster forum. Every year the conference will be hosted at a different university in the state on the last weekend in February. In addition to research presentations, there are also exhibitors from graduate programs and other opportunities targeted for students involved in undergraduate research.
Questions? Please contact [email protected]

Wednesday, January 25, 2017
Center for Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Seminar, 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m., Boca EE-106,  VC to Jupiter, RF-119, Davie LA-148, HBOI LE-108D.
Speaker: Dr. Aaron Beeler PhD, MD
Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry, Boston University, MA
Title: “Flow Enabled Synthesis and Medicinal Chemistry”
Abstract:  In the Beeler Research Group we are developing new technologies and approaches to enable medicinal chemistry.  The first half of the lecture will highlight flow reactions that we have developed in our lab to access bioactive natural products and analogs.  Why flow chemistry?  Reactions have been carried out in batch vessels for over two centuries and amazingly, the tools chemists use, have remained largely unchanged.  As such, many of the challenges presented by batch reactions have remained unsolved. Issues related to mass transfer, heat transfer, or photon penetration can been exceptionally challenging in batch reactors, but can often be overcome in flow.  Furthermore, reactions utilizing highly reactive or short lived intermediates can be inherently dangerous or impossible in batch, but possible in flow.  Ultimately, flow chemistry provides chemists with a tool for development of new and more efficient reactions that are robust, highly scalable, and provide access to challenging and novel chemotypes.
The second half of the lecture will focus on the development of tools for medicinal chemistry that can make discovery and optimization for efficient. The discovery and development of a novel HDAC8 inhibitor will highlight the potential for new tools, technologies, and approaches in medicinal chemistry. We have developed a potent and selective HDAC8 inhibitor and in a collaborative effort with the Hancock group (Children’s Hospital Philadelphia) have shown that HDAC8 is a key modulator of regulatory T cell function.  Studies, utilizing our inhibitor have validated HDAC8 as a therapeutic target for suppressing regulatory T cell function and we have used our compound to promote host anti-tumor immune responses.
Hosted by: Dr. Stephane Roche, Ph.D.
Questions? Marjorie Cazeau ([email protected]) for more information or to subscribe to the seminar email list.

Friday, January 27
Physics Colloquium, 2:00 p.m., Boca, SE 319
Speaker: Maurizio Giannotti
Barry University
Title: “Astrophysical Anomalies and Axions: the physics potential of the International Axion Observatory”
Abstract: I will give an update on the anomalies observed in the cooling of several stellar systems and on the interpretation in terms of axions and axion like particles (ALPs). I will show that the relevant region in the axion and ALP parameter space hinted by these anomalies can be probed by the next generation of axion detectors, in particular by the International Axion Observatory (IAXO).
Questions?  [email protected]

Friday, January 27
Pre-Health Professions Office: 2017 Workshop Series, 2:00 p.m., Boca, SE 319B
Speaker: Latarsha Morgan
Title: The Basics
For: freshmen, sophomores. Learn about: how to be a competitive applicant, recommended courses, pre-health office, advisestream account, admission exams, MCAT, and when to apply.
Questions? Contact [email protected] 

Friday, January 27, 2:00-3:20 p.m.
Geosciences Colloquium Series,  Boca, SE 417 and VC to Davie DW 327, and to Harbor Branch LE 108D 
Speaker: Erik Johanson, University of Tennessee
Title: “Environmental Change, Climate, and People Across the Late Holocene”
Questions?  Contact Caiyun Zhang, [email protected]

Friday, January 27
Mathematical Sciences Colloquium, 4:00 p.m., Boca, SE 215
Speaker: Kasia Rejniak, Ph.D.
Moffitt Cancer Center, Integrated Mathematical Oncology Department
Title: Mathematical modeling of the interstitial drug transport in pancreatic tumors: integration of in-silico and in-vivo experiments
Abstract: Anticancer treatments, such as chemotherapy or targeted therapy, must overcome numerous transport barriers to be effective. I will discuss several of them, and present mathematical models based on the fluid-structure interaction techniques, diffusion-reaction and receptor kinetics equations, that can capture and test various aspects of drug interstitial transport. In particular, I will focus on a novel computational model of the microenvironment-driven microscale pharmacology, and discuss how it can improve our understanding of the mechanical properties of tumor tissues and how it can contribute to the development of personalized anti-cancer treatment protocols.
Questions? Contact [email protected]

Friday, January 27
Pre-Health Professions Office: 2017 Workshop Series, 5:00 p.m., Boca, SE 319B
Speaker: Brooke Sheetz
Title: Post-Baccalaureate Medical Pathway Program
Recommended for: students who have earned a Bachelor’s degree and are now interested in pursuing a health related graduate program. Overview of the Post-Baccalaureate Medical Pathway Program.
Questions? Contact [email protected]

Tuesday, January 17
Owl’s Nest Kickoff Reception,
FAU Club, Engineering East Building, Boca Campus. 4:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Meet the Dean!  Light Refreshments
RSVP:  https://fauf.fau.edu/owlsnestkickoff

Wednesday, January 18
Center for Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Seminar, 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m., Boca EE-106
VC to Jupiter, RF-119, Davie DW-108, HBOI LE-108D.
Speaker: Dr. Dennis Klinman PhD, MD, Senior Investigator, Cancer and Inflammation Program,Head, Immune Modulation Section, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD
About the Speaker:  Dr. Klinman co-discovered CpG oligonucleotides (ODN) and demonstrated that they were TLR9 agonists in Man. He pioneered the use of CpG ODN as vaccine adjuvants and immunoprotective agents. He also discovered immunosuppressive ODN and demonstrated their ability to treat/prevent autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Dr. Klinman’s lab focuses on modifying the innate immune system to alter inflammation and host susceptibility to cancer.
Areas of Expertise :  1) immunotherapy, 2) cancer vaccines, 3) innate immunity, 4) TLR agonists
Hosted by: Dr. Jim Hartmann, Ph.D.
Questions? Marjorie Cazeau ([email protected]) for more information or to subscribe to the seminar email list.

Thursday, January 19
Analysis and Applications Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Boca, SE 215
Speaker: Daniel Seco, Ph.D.,  Universitat de Barcelona
Title: Zeros of optimal polynomial approximants: Jacobi matrices and Jentzsch-type theorems
Abstract: I will present a recent work with B\´en\´eteau, Khavinson, Liaw and Simanek where we study the structure of the zeros of polynomials appearing in the study of cyclicity in Hilbert spaces of analytic functions. We find the minimum possible modulus of occurring zeros via a nonlinear extremal problem associated with norms of Jacobi matrices. We examine global properties of these zeros and prove Jentzsch-type theorems describing where they accumulate.
Questions? Contact Erik Lundberg [email protected] 

Friday, January 20
Marine Science Seminar, Noon, Boca, SC 141, Davie LA 148, HBOI MC 209
Speaker:  Sarah Hoffmann,  Ph.D. candidate from the Integrative Biology program at FAU,
Title: To the Grand Banks, and beyond: making the most out of graduate school through collaborations, side projects, and volunteering.
Summary:  Sharks are one of the most threatened groups of marine fishes, but the majority of research, advocacy, and management attention to date has focused on threats stemming from commercial fisheries. In this seminar, Dr. David Shiffman will present his interdisciplinary research on threats that sharks face from recreational fisheries in Florida, including charterboat fishing, land-based fishing, and trophy fishing. This research includes assessments of the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of different groups of recreational shark anglers, as well as recommended policy solutions.
Questions? Contact Marianne Porter [email protected] 


Tuesday, January 10
Neuroscience Seminar Series, 4:00 p.m., Boca, EE 106
Speaker: Hermes H. Yeh, Ph.D.
William W. Brown Professor of Physiology and Neurobiology, Department of Molecular and Systems Biology Director, Program in Experimental and Molecular Medicine Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth
Host: Jang-Yen Wu, Ph.D.
Title: Neuronal Migration, Cortical Form and Function and FASD
Questions? Contact [email protected] 

Wednesday, January 11
FURC 2017: Abstract deadline
For more information on how to submit your abstract, please click  here .
The Florida Undergraduate Research Conference (FURC) is one of the nation's largest multi-disciplinary research conferences. It is an annual event open to all undergraduate researchers in the state of Florida to present their research in a poster forum. Every year the conference will be hosted at a different university in the state on the last weekend in February. In addition to research presentations, there are also exhibitors from graduate programs and other opportunities targeted for students involved in undergraduate research.
Questions? Please contact [email protected] 

Thursday, January 12
Analysis and Applications Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Boca, SE 215
Speaker: Dragan Radulovic, Ph.D.
Title: Copula function: the formula that killed Wall Street
Abstract: Copula function is a classical probabilistic formula designed to capture the dependency structure between two random variables. Recently this approach has gained some momentum, primarily because it addresses the non-Gaussian settings which in turn cannot be described by correlation coefficients. The talk will have a large, non-technical portion, where I plan to introduce some basic facts and motivations. I also plan to describe my contribution to this field as well as some new ideas and projects in progress.
Questions? Contact Erik Lundberg [email protected] 

Friday, January 13
Marine Science Seminar, Noon, Boca, SC 141, Davie LA 148, HBOI MC 209
Speaker: Dr. David Shiffman, Ph.D., University of Miami
Title: Recreational shark fishing in Florida: an interdisciplinary analysis of an emerging conservation issue
Sharks are one of the most threatened groups of marine fishes, but the majority of research, advocacy, and management attention to date has focused on threats stemming from commercial fisheries. In this seminar, Dr. David Shiffman will present his interdisciplinary research on threats that sharks face from recreational fisheries in Florida, including charterboat fishing, land-based fishing, and trophy fishing. This research includes assessments of the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of different groups of recreational shark anglers, as well as recommended policy solutions.
Questions? Contact Marianne Porter [email protected]  

Friday, January 13
Physics Colloquia, 2:00 p.m., Boca, SE 319
Speaker: Jim McGuire
Title: Numbers that come from Nowhere
Abstract: In QED Feynman wrote: "There is a most profound and beautiful question associated with the observed coupling constant, e, the amplitude for a real electron to emit or absorb a real photon. It is a simple number that has been experimentally determined to be close to 0.08542455. (My physicist friends won't recognize this number, because they like to remember it as the inverse of its square: about 137.03597 with about an uncertainty of about 2 in the last decimal place. It has been a mystery ever since it was discovered more than fifty years ago, and all good theoretical physicists put this number up on their wall and worry about it.)" I have never seen it written on anvone's wall except Feynman's. This talk will be a discussion of this and other numbers that come from nowhere.
Questions? Contact Wolfgang Tichy, [email protected]

Friday, January 13
Frontiers in Science: 2017 Public Lecture Series, Lecture: 3:30 p.m., Reception: 4:30 p.m., Boca Raton, BC 126
Speaker: Lisa C. Offringa, Ph.D.
Research Fellow, Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University
Lecturer, University of California at Berkeley and San Francisco State University
Title: Trust your Gut—Microbes, High Fiber, and Your Health
“We have seven speakers for you this year, experts in the fields of Biology, Chemistry, Geosciences, Marine Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, and Psychology. We’ve brought them to you from across the globe and right here in our own community. My hope is that these lectures stir you to deeper learning, explain your world, ignite your discussions, and bring the richness of the sciences to you.” – Ata Sarajedini, Ph.D., New Dean, Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Questions? Contact Mary Beth Mudrick at (561)297-4526 or [email protected]



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